When comparing LED and HID fish lights, there are many things to consider. Some fish light companies use LED lights for their dock systems. While LED lights are relatively bright compared to typical lights we, as consumers, are used to on a daily basis, they are not always bright enough to light up a large area by your dock. LED lights also do not generate heat; therefore, they are unable to clean themselves. This will lead to excessive aquatic growth, like barnacles and algae, to build up on the light in the water, and eventually render the light useless. To recap, LED lights struggle in two ways; they are not very bright, and they cannot clean themselves.

The best type of light for permanent dock installation are HID lights. These bulbs are not only over 300% brighter than LED lights, they are also self-cleaning. These bulbs generate enough heat to burn off any aquatic growth that tries to grow on the bulbs. Because of this, high-quality fish lights run on a photocell, which turns it on each night and off each morning. This ensures the light will turn on all night, every night, to it can remain clean and barnacle/algae free. The photocell also builds a feeding cycle for the fish, teaching them that each night they can find food by your dock, so they will keep coming back.

It is also important to be wary of the lumens posted on many fish light websites. Some companies claim their 175-watt bulb gives off 22,000 lumens. This is absolutely false. Unfortunately, the tool that is required to measure lumens is incredibly expensive, therefore no customers are able to dispute the claims made by these customers. While comparing fish lights, you must look at the wattage of the light. All 250-watt lights will have 14,500 lumens, and all 175-watt lights will have 9,000 lumens, no matter what the company claims. If you are comparing companies, be sure to look at the individual components they use to build their lights. While some use simple extension cords (which is illegal), other companies will use UL approved underwater-rated wire. Many companies only have a one-year warranty while others have three-year warranties. Do not let claims of high lumens trick you!


It’s all up to you! Night fishing can be fun…or miserable. It all depends on how prepared you are!

If you went night fishing as a kid, the exhilaration of being out at night when everyone else was asleep may have been enough to keep you entertained. But as an adult, nighttime fishing can be frustrating if you’re not prepared. Whether you are fishing off your boat or off a dock or pier, fishing at night can be difficult if you’re not organized.

  1. Check the forecast
    • How many times have you gone out only to wish you had paid more attention to the weather forecast? Bad weather can make a potentially fun night of fishing a wretched experience.
  2. Check your supplies
    • Go through that tackle box to make sure you have everything and everything is organized. There’s only one thing worse than trying to find something in a disorganized tackle box and that’s trying to do it in the dark.
  3. Check your equipment
    • Make sure your poles are ready and lines are in good shape.
  4. Using a boat? Make sure your boat is maintained and in good working order.
    • Breaking down isn’t fun. Breaking down at night? Far less fun. Go through the boat to make sure everything is in place and secure. Make sure all equipment is working properly. Make sure to pre-tie enough leads and rigs to last the whole trip.
  5. Safety First
  6. Check that first aid kit to make sure it’s well stocked.
    • It’s hard to tell the seriousness of a cut or wound at night and you want to be prepared for anything.
  7. Know your area.
    • You want to be able to anchor properly. Sometimes it’s best to get out early when there’s still some daylight.
  8. Light sources.
    • Make sure you have sufficient light sources for your own functional needs. But also consider fish lights to attract baitfish. Lights are not only important for the fisherman but also stimulate the fish into looking for food.

Fishing for night feeders is often all about smell or movement. Many night feeders sense the wounded prey or smell it so a good chum line can be very effective at night.

If you’re anchored in a good area, you can also make use of the feeding frenzy caused by an underwater fish light. Night feeders are often attracted by the movement of baitfish that are lured by plankton that is drawn by lights that are either mounted to the boat or submerged off the side. These fish are drawn by the lure of an easy meal so night fishing with a submersible fish light can often be far more productive than fishing without one.

If you are fishing off a pier, nighttime is often the best time due to the amount of lights that are typically shining on the water. You can watch the veritable feeding frenzy off the side of a pier on any given night. If you are fishing off your own dock, underwater fish lights can be affixed to your dock to boost your catch capabilities at night. Either way, the use of lights can stimulate fish into going for an easy meal.

Fishing at night can be a great experience if you’re organized and well equipped. Don’t miss out on the abundance of fish that are active only at night. You just may find that you like fishing at night better than during the day. No sunburn, less competition, and more active fish! What’s not to like?


Most people that purchase an Underwater Fish Light, do it to catch fish, but before you throw out lines, there are a few things you should know:

  1. Protect your system! Obviously, if you’re fishing, you’ll be using sharp hooks. These hooks can snag the wire going out to your bulb, which will cause your system to trip. Each of our systems come equipped with a GFCI plug for safety. So, if anything in the system is damaged, the GFCI will turn it off to avoid any further damage. The best way to protect your system is to get some form of protective sheathing around that wire. Our version of this protection is called Wire Shield. It’s just a heavy duty hose that wraps around the wire and adds a layer of protection to it. If a hook were to snag the Wire Shield, it wouldn’t cause any damage to your system.
  2. Choose the right bait or lures! In order to be successful, you have to match your bait or lures to what you see at your light already. If you light is full of tiny shrimp, then use a shrimp lure or some shrimp bait. If you see more schools of minnows, then try to use lures or bait that match the same size. The predator fish at your light are already attracted to the current food source (baitfish). By matching your what’s on your hook to what’s on your light, you’ll find much more success!
  3. Don’t scare them all away! Fish like snook or tarpon are very smart. If you were to start overfishing your light, you might start noticing less and less predator fish. While the lights are great for fishing, it’s smarter to only fish your light every few days to ensure you don’t spook your prize fish!

These are just three simple tips to help you land those big fish at your light. You can see them, now go catch them!!

 


If you’re not a night fisherman, you may be missing out.

Night fishing exposes you to those night feeders that just don’t come out during the day. Many species are simply more active at night. There are numerous reasons, some of which are tides and moon phase. Water temperature is cooler, especially in summer months. Many fish tend to dive to deeper waters during the heat of the day. But for whatever reason, many fish are just far more active at night. Although fish don’t see well at night, many fish rely on movement and smell to locate food sources.

As a fisherman, it may be harder to maneuver at night, but that’s where the use of fish lights can be advantageous, not only for you, but also the fish. Fish can be triggered into a feeding frenzy once you introduce a light source, in particular, a submersible one.

Submersible fish lights directly project into the water and cause reflections. The light creates a feeding environment for plankton and baitfish. We used to think that light simply attracted more insects but we now know that it’s more about attracting the plankton and phytoplankton that baitfish feed on. And where you have an abundance of baitfish, your predators are close behind. The more baitfish that are attracted, the more of a “frenzy” is created, luring the larger fish to an area of feeding abundance. This works for both day and night feeders.

The wavelength spectrum of particular colors seem to work best. Just like the color green is easier on our eyes, green seems to work well with fish. Green and white fish lights tend to attract more freshwater fish with the color blue working well in saltwater.

HID fish lights are the most powerful when electrical capability is handy. When an electrical outlet isn’t available for HID lights, there are now new and more powerful LED lights that can be powered off a 12v outlet port or battery from your boat. The best submersible lights offer 360 degree coverage. This should be done from an anchored boat so you have a fixed position. The fish will be attracted to a submersible fish light the way they are naturally attracted to light sources on fixed structures like docks or piers. These lights can be weighted or fixed to the boat with suction cups. More is better. Try two or three lights at once for a larger throw of illumination.

Of course, it’s always important to make sure you choose a location where the fish are. If there are no fish, it makes no difference if the area is lighted or not. It’s still important to know your fishing spot. Too deep, too shallow, or not enough hiding spots for fish and your chances of catching fish will be limited. So check out your spot during the day first.

Go ahead. Become a night fisherman. You may decide you like it better than the daytime and find that your catch is far greater with the use of an underwater fish light.

 


What Are Fish Attracted To?

What Do Fish Eat

While a lot of us are attracted to a pretty face and a good sense of humor, fish are a little bit different. To attract fish, you have to recreate their food chain. The beautiful marine food chain starts with plants. Plants like mangroves, marsh grasses, and marine algae all produce their own food through photosynthesis. They also provide food for other organisms living in their environment.

The next link in the food chain are the Primary Consumers. This group includes zooplankton, phytoplankton, mayfly nymphs, and more. These primary consumers get their food from our friendly neighborhood plants. The next group is called Secondary Consumers. This group includes small fish like mullet.These guys feed on the primary consumers and other plant life.

The next group is the Top Predators group. This group includes large fish like snook, tarpon, redfish, and much more. These are the types of fish most people want to see at their dock. Top predators eat all of the other smaller fish around like mullet, shrimp, etc.

So How Do You Get The Fish To Show Up?

Fish Light

So, as with any chain, if one link breaks, everything falls apart. If you don’t have each piece of this chain by your dock, you’re not going to see those predator fish that are so fun to watch and catch.

The best way to attract fish to your dock is by enhancing the natural environment in your waterway. Dock Lights are a great way to do this rather quickly. When you place a dock light (also known as fish light or snook light) in the water, it starts the process of attracting fish immediately. The light bulb reflects off the microorganisms like phytoplankton in the water. With this extra illumination, the primary and secondary consumers start flooding your light. Within a few days, you’ll start to see more activity at your light. As time goes on, you’ll see more and more species of fish get attracted to the light. Now all you need to do is just relax and enjoy your new natural aquarium!


Know The Species

It would next to impossible to go night fishing without knowing exactly what you’re fishing for. To avoid getting a boat full of catfish, you’ll need to learn and understand the species you’re targeting. Unless of course, catfish is your goal. If so, you shouldn’t have too much trouble! There are many more than just the two species we have listed here, but these are the most popular. If you don’t see your favorite fish species below, don’t fret! Shoot us an email and tell us about your favorite species to night fish for and you can be featured in our next blog or video!

Snook

Snook are known for being smart, and also good fighters. If you want to catch a snook, you’re going to have to work for it. Snook are one of the most popular recreationally fished species in the country. They’re incredibly fun to fight, and make a really good meal. Commercial fishing for this species is outlawed in multiple states, so snook have become something of a rare meal unless you find yourself catching some snook during season!

Snook usually eat small baitfish and crustaceans like shrimp. They perform “ambush strikes” that are strong enough for you to feel in your rod when they strike. After setting your hook, they put up a big fight. Many times, snook will try to swim under docks or around other structures and break your line, so try to steer them away! Even though it sounds rather daunting, snook are one of the most fun fish to fight and catch. So get out there and have some fun!

Tarpon

Tarpon, also known as the “silver king”, is one of the most popular recreational species in Florida. Every year, thousands of people travel to different areas of Florida during tarpon season to try to land a huge tarpon. These fish can grow to be massive, with the largest tarpon catch weighing over 295 lbs. This species is also known for their frequent jumps while on the hook. Tarpon can jump up to 10ft in the air while shaking their gills. Many fishermen will tell you that the most frequent time they lose a tarpon is when they’re in mid-jump. Whether you’re fishing with artificial lures or flies, it’s best to keep to dark colors while targeting tarpon. Deep purples and blacks tend to achieve more attention from the tarpon than most other colors. Landing a tarpon is one of the most exciting things an inshore fisherman can experience. So go give it a shot!

Get the Right Gear

One of the most important things to remember while fishing with dock lights is to bring the right gear. Seeing the fish is one thing, but actually showing them something they want to strike at, is a different matter all together. You don’t want to get all the way out to a good fishing spot and not have the tools you need! Below are the best lures we suggest for fishing dock lights, as well as some other tools that really come in handy.

DOA TerrorEyz

The DOA TerrorEyz lure is a GREAT choice when it comes dock light fishing. No matter how many lures you put in your tackle box, this small minnow should definitely be one of them! Designed to set horizontally, even on a vertical drop – this unique rigging method allows for an extremely high hook up ratio. The design also allows this lure to hold in strong current. This patented design has been proven to catch anything from freshwater Crappie and Walleye to saltwater Tarpon and Spanish Mackerel. Multiple weighted eyes are available for each size lure

DOA Bait Buster

One more shoutout for DOA is the DOA Bait Buster! We suggest using the Deep Runner Bait Busters. The bigger guys usually like to swim deeper! Depending on the model, this lure will tease the fish on the surface or along the bottom. The single upright hook system reduces hang-ups and weed problems. The hollow body allows the lure to collapse in the fish’s mouth and insures better hooksets. Anywhere you fish — from casting in the local bass pond to trolling offshore — DOA Bait Buster lures will produce for you.

LiveTarget Sardine Swimbait

LiveTarget has combined nature’s best with modern technology to create an exciting new collection of swimbaits. Available in common forages, the new LiveTarget Swimbait Series is designed to look and swim just like live bait. The profile of the body and tail is so accurately matched and anatomically scaled, it sets a new industry standard to match-the-hatch. The tail is precisely fitted with a strategically engineered oscillator that generates a side-to-side tail swing action. Every swimbait has its own signature action, making it come alive and swim just like its natural counterpart.

LED Headlamp

It’s not very shocking that it’s dark while you’re out night fishing. This might be an obvious choice when going dock light fishing, but many people forget about it! All of us here at Underwater Fish Light have been stuck out in the dark without a headlamp, and trust me, it was not fun. These great energizer headlamps are cheap and work great! There are also some other light configurations like light clips, or just a flashlight, but we’ve found that it’s easier to use the handsfree headlamp that will turn in the direction you’re looking at.


Get To Know The Snook

Our Underwater Fish Lights aren’t called “snook lights” for no reason! The longer your light is in the water, the more fish you are going to see. One of the most popular inshore species of fish our customers see is the snook. Our lights will also attract tarpon, redfish, and many more predator fish species.

Some customers purchase our dock lights to make it easier to see and catch snook, and they are never disappointed! Snook are one of the most popular inshore gamefish. They are caught recreationally in the Gulf of Mexico, as well as the Atlantic. Commercial fishing of snook has been prohibited in multiple states. Because of this, most of the targeting of snook is done by recreational fishermen.

Know Where To Look

Snook generally like to hang out in mangroves, but also around bridges, docks, and other structures. So, when you see a dock light, you will most likely see snook swimming around. Most snook will be hanging out in the shadows. They might only swim through the light to strike at a bait fish that was attracted to the light. 

Fake It Till You Make It

They key to landing a snook at a fish light is simple. Just act as much like the baitfish as possible. Obviously, we don’t mean you should jump in the water and start swimming around the light. We’re referring to what you have on your hook. You’ll want to ensure your lure or live bait are swimming in the patterns as the other fish around the light.

If you do not see much shrimp at your dock light, then we suggest against using shrimp bait or lures on your hook. If you see mostly small minnows, then choose a lure that matches those species.

Once you have something on your hook that resembles the rest of the baitfish, it’s time to start casting. You’ll want to cast out into the shadows passed the light, then reel your line in through the fish light. This will keep your lure from scaring everything in the light when it “plops” into the water.

Just keep casting in a pattern matching the bait fish and within a few casts, you should have a fish on! 

Don’t Lose It!

When you hook the snook, it’s going to be a little bit of a fight depending on the size. Snook are smart, and they’ll try to lose the hook by jumping, or swimming under and through different structures. When you first hook the snook, try to steer it away from the dock pilings and any other waterway obstructions. For many fishermen, once the snook juts under a dock, the fight is lost. So, stay vigilant and have fun! Snook are one of the most fun inshore species of fish to catch! Good luck and tight lines to all!


You’ve got to be prepared!

1. A Headlamp

It’s not very shocking that it’s dark while you’re out night fishing. This might be an obvious choice when going dock light fishing, but many people forget about it! All of us here at Underwater Fish Light have been stuck out in the dark without a headlamp, and trust me, it was not fun. These great energizer headlamps are cheap and work great! There are also some other light configurations like light clips, or just a flashlight, but we’ve found that it’s easier to use the handsfree headlamp that will turn in the direction you’re looking at.

2. DOA TerrorEyz

The DOA TerrorEyz lure is a GREAT choice when it comes dock light fishing. No matter how many lures you put in your tackle box, this small minnow should definitely be one of them!

3. Tsunami Pliers

The Tsunami Fishing Fliers are an essential tool to your tackle box. Many fishermen will tell you how useful a pair of pliers are, and they’re not lying!

4. Vanish Fluorocarbon Leader

Vanish Fluocarbon Leader is a great choice for a leader. You’ll want to make sure that the fish you’re targeting can’t see your leader. Vanish Fluorocarbon Leader will help you use effective lures without spooking any of the fish!

5. DOA Bait Buster

One more shoutout for DOA is the DOA Bait Buster! We suggest using the Deep Runner Bait Busters. The bigger guys usually like to swim deeper!


Many people choose to go fishing at night so they can target those amazing dock lights that are always full of fish. Well, here are a few techniques to help you land your catch of a lifetime the next time you go out!

1. When it comes to bait and lures, choose wisely.

The key to fishing dock lights successfully is to match the bait or lure on your hook to the bait you see swimming around the light. The species will differ on your location, but more often then not, it will be tiny minnows. Sometimes, in high current areas, you’ll see some shrimp, but in most canal waterways, you’ll see small baitfish.

Anglers who love live bait don’t usually have any problems with this approach. Simply throw out a cast net or two and head out to the dock lights when you’ve got enough little baitfish to fill your bait bucket!

For those of you that are die-hard artificial lure fans, the DOA TerrorEyz lure is a great choice for fishing dock lights. Our favorite color variation is the Pearl color.

For our fly fishing friends, just try to take out a few different types of clear or white minnow patterns. These tend to blend in well with the other baitfish around. Below is an example of our two favorite flies for dock lights; the schminnow and the glass minnow. These two patterns are exceptionally easy to tie, if you’re the in-depth type of fly fisherman. We suggest going out with a handful of each of these patterns to ensure you don’t have worry if you lose any.

 

2. Wait and Watch

When you first pull up to a dock light, watch how the predator fish interact with the baitfish. Observe the patterns the baitfish swim in and how the predators interrupt those patterns for strikes. You don’t want to just start casting into the light with no plan. Learn what the real baitfish are doing, so you can go into a better plan regarding your casting and retrieving. By taking just a few minutes to monitor the situation, you’ll be able to learn how often the predators are striking (if at all), which baitfish they choose to strike, and how to recreate those moments yourself.

3. Monkey see, monkey do

After you’ve watched the marine behavior for a little while, try to mimic that behavior yourself with your lure or fly. by mimicking the look and behavior of the other baitfish as close as possible, the predators will have a more difficult time telling the difference.

4. It’s all about presentation

Most fly fishers know the importance of a natural presentation. You don’t want to throw your fly or heavy lure directly into the middle of the light. That will just scare everything away. Try to cast out into the shadows past the light, then retrieve your hook through the dock light while matching the baitfish swimming patterns.

5. Be aware of your surroundings

When you finally hook a fish around a dock light, it seems like their favorite thing to is is go straight under the dock. It’s easy to get tangled and possibly lose your fish when this happens. So be ready to steer him out of the way right after the hook set! Don’t get discouraged if you lose a few. We’ve all fallen victim to a smart snook here and there. If you’re in a kayak or smaller vessel, try to anchor yourself at an angle where you can best steer the fish out towards the canal.

Bonus: Just have fun!

Dock lights are an amazing way to catch and view fish. Enjoy the night, and be safe while trying to reel in those big guys!


When it comes to fishing off a pier or dock, using an LED Fish Light can make things much more fun! Here are a few tips to help make your LED dock light fishing trips more successful:

1. Location location location

LED fish lights only attract fish that are in the area. If you take your fish out to a dock or pier that doesn’t have much fish traffic, you’ll be sorely disappointed. These lights don’t make fish appear out of thin air. The fish already have to be int he general area in order for them to work. Using these lights at your favorite pier or honey hole, will bring you great results! If you happen to throw the light into a dead area, you sadly won’t see much.

2. Don’t Rush Into It

When you first throw your LED light into the water, give it some time before you start throwing lines out. Give the fish some time to notice, and become attracted to the light. LED dock lights are a magic magnet that brings the fish immediately to you. These lights build a natural food source for the fish. When the light from the LEDs reflect off the particles in the water, it attracts baitfish. After the baitfish start swarming, you’ll see the predator fish start to come too. This process takes time, so we suggest to throw the light in, then come back a little later. We like to throw our LED fishing lights into the water, then get all of our fishing gear ready. This gives the light time to do its thing while you get ready for a full night of fun. 

3. Watch and Learn

Once you see the fish start to come towards the light, watch their behavior for a little bit. Try to find the patterns the baitfish are swimming in. Also, try to pinpoint which baitfish the larger predator fish tend to gravitate towards. This little bit of time isn’t just relaxing, it helps you formulate a game plan for your retrieval strategies later. This extra little time also lets the fish become comfortable in the light. You don’t want to spook them away from the spot before you even get a chance to catch any of them!

4. Monkey See, Monkey Do!

Now that you know the patterns the fish are swimming in, you can finally throw out your line! It’s important to ensure that you’re retrieval patterns match the same behavior as the other baitfish that are swimming around. Predator fish light snook, tarpon, and redfish aren’t dumb! They can sense when something is off. 

Have fun!

This is the most important thing! We build these great dock lights to bring enjoyment to everyone who has the pleasure to use them! We hope you enjoy your light and bring in the catch of a lifetime!